Cancers – Other Medical Effects 2

http://www.emperors-clothes.com/1/rem.htm

http://www.worldproutassembly.org/archives/2006/05/world_is_blind.html

http://www.thewe.cc/weplanet/news/depleted_uranium_iraq_afghanistan_balkans.html

http://www.anaisdedermatologia.org.br/_img/figuras_en/20050630190946.jpg

Why these leukemias aren’t caused by toxins

https://i2.wp.com/i1014.photobucket.com/albums/af266/haremountain/Ca%20and%20medical%20effects%20I/1-5-6-1_border.gif

My comment: Only radiation induces leukemia at such an early onset after exposure.

http://www.pcf.city.hiroshima.jp/peacesite/English/Stage1/1-5/1-5-6E.html

Workers were fitted with respirators

Photo: The site was flooded with people trying to assist, many wearing no or improper PPE.

Photo: One of OSHA’s PPE distribution centers and respirator fit test stations near the disaster site.

Photo: Norm Black (left) helps a New York City police officer fit her respirator.

http://911research.wtc7.net/cache/wtc/analysis/asse_groundzero1.htm

Caregiving: WTC’s toxic dust clouds

By ALEX CUKAN

ALBANY, N.Y., Sept. 14 (UPI) — It’s one thing to be killed or injured in a terrorist attack, but it’s quite another to die or become ill because government bureaucrats give incorrect or conflicting reports.

That’s what makes the plight of 40,000 first responders, construction workers and volunteers so tragic, because as they stepped up to rescue people from the burning World Trade Center and later dig through rubble looking for body parts, government officials did not stress respiratory precautions.

“Given the scope of the tragedy from last week, I am glad to reassure the people of New York and Washington that their air is safe to breath and their water is safe to drink,” Christie Whitman, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in 2001, said one week after the attacks.

When the first tower collapsed releasing a toxic dust cloud in Lower Manhattan, I knew the dust would be harmful, but no one seemed to be wearing a respirator — a few wore a disposable dust mask, which would provide little protection in this type of situation. I called several government agencies hoping that if there was a respirator shortage I could make it public and perhaps a company would provide respirators quickly.

All the agencies said respirators would be provided, but the response of the New York State Emergency Management Office was the most memorable.

“Little lady, if they need respirators, they’ll have respirators,” a spokesman for the SEMO told me on Sept. 13, 2001. Actually, the respirators weren’t available until several weeks into the recovery, and when they arrived, workers and volunteers said they were told the wrong respirators had been ordered.

I started reporting on the Sept. 11 attacks minutes after the first plane crashed, and after the first two weeks I was editing the daily updates on the World Trade Center six days a week. The days were long, but when I had the chance I tried to confirm what government officials were saying about the potential health effects at Ground Zero. It was like nailing Jell-O to the wall.

Whitman continued to make statements on the safety of air and water in Lower Manhattan, and in turn, New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani said the air quality near Ground Zero “is safe.”

“I’m no expert on it. So I have to rely on the EPA and the state agencies and the city agencies and the private monitoring,” the mayor said. “And all of that says the problems that this created are not dramatic. They’re not health-threatening.”

“You smell it and you feel there must be something wrong, but what I’m told is it’s not dangerous to your health,” he added.

Indeed, the New York City Health Department said because asbestos was used in the construction of the Twin Towers, some asbestos was found in dust, debris and air samples, and individuals working in the area have been advised to take precautions.

“However, most of the air samples have been below levels of concern,” the EPA said.

In turn, the New York City Health Department said the risk of developing an asbestos-related illness following an exposure of short duration is extremely low.

I dare say that in the past 20 years there hasn’t been a mayor in New York state that hasn’t dealt with asbestos abatement for schools and public buildings.

Asbestos abatement has strict procedures to prevent the asbestos fibers from spreading throughout the building, and the workers are required to wear moon suits, gloves, protective eyewear and respirators. They also need training, which usually takes about one day.

One EMS volunteer told me that in the first few days at Ground Zero there were people who had bleeding eyes and were coughing continually, but they would not stop for anything as they looked for survivors.

Some had respirators but did not wear them. Wearing a respirator is no fun; it’s hot and it can be hard to breathe and requires some training — usually a half-hour — to ensure it fits correctly. Part of the training is explaining the risks of not wearing the respirator.

“For the respirators to work properly, a person needs some training because they must not have any facial hair, but there are still are lot of beards and mustaches on people working at the site,” a worker safety advocate told me five years ago.

Because of the special circumstances, Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulatory control over Ground Zero was removed, so there wasn’t anyone really enforcing worker safety.

By the end of September 2001 the U.S. Geological Survey had done extensive field testing and found the WTC dust was quite alkaline with a pH of 9.5 to 11.5, which can be corrosive to the skin, eyes and respiratory system. For an article, the USGS told me that its testing results indicated “clean-up of dust and debris should be done with appropriate respiratory and dust control measures.” Again, not a surprise for anyone familiar with concrete or building demolition.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/upi/index.php?feed=Science&article=UPI-1-20060914-17582200-bc-caregiving-wtc-1.xml

http://chem11.proboards2.com/index.cgi?board=politics&action=display&thread=1085300416&page=18

11.3 cubic meters of kerosene cause 400+ cancers?

https://i2.wp.com/i1014.photobucket.com/albums/af266/haremountain/Ca%20and%20medical%20effects%20I/tanks_almost_empty_border.jpg

http://www.757.org.uk/systems/sys1.html

This is the amount of fuel (3,500 gallons) that remained to cause the fire in the Twin Tower according to FEMA.

3 cubic meter skip

10 cubic meter skip

http://dialatip.com.au/Bin_Sizes.html

The US Government’s Usage of Atomic Bombs – Domestic – WTC

By Ed Ward, MD

Declassified August 1958: “Mere fact that the U. S. has developed atomic munitions suitable for use in demolition work.” Declassified January 1967, “The fact that we are interested in and are continuing studies on a weapon for minimizing the emerging flux of neutrons and internal induced activity.” Declassified March 1976, “The fact of weapon laboratory interest in Minimum Residual Radiation (MRR) devices. The fact of successful development of MRR devices.”

The factual evidence indicates that our government is using and has used 3rd or possibly 4th generation hydrogen bombs domestically and internationally. The evidence for international usage is not quite as strong as the domestic usage, but when domestic usage is considered, the international usage seems inescapable. The process of exclusion based on the known facts leaves only one viable option for the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) buildings – a relatively pure hydrogen bomb.

Just some of the facts are: widespread cancer in the responders, molten steel, melted cars, steel beams hurled hundreds of feet, aerosolized metals, vaporized steel witnessed and video, aerosolized and pulverized concrete, elevated tritium levels, vanishing (vaporized) victims, only sliver fragments of victims on roof tops, EMP – Electro Magnetic Pulse effects on communications, hundreds of eyewitness testimony of ancillary explosions by heroic rescuers and victims, massive dispersal of debris, demolition expert states hydrogen bomb needed for this type of demolition, audio of a massive explosion prior to collapse, video of ancillary explosions, audio of ancillary explosions, significant reduction in debris pile, ancillary thermate found in wreckage, shockwave of a mini yield nuclear blast knocked people off their feet, vaporization of 200,000 gallons of water, removal of wreckage without investigation, only remnants of fire in one tower minutes after the plane collision, unprecedented history of 3 skyscrapers collapsing secondary to fire, early miscalculation stating WTC building 7 ‘pulled’, towers fall at demolition or free fall speed, foreknowledge of WTC 7 immediate collapse, slow-motion video evidence of plane appendage with smoke and explosion immediately prior to impact of both planes, unprecedented NORAD non response to variant flights, FEMA drill scheduled for same day, military ‘exercise’ of exactly what was taking place to prevent NORAD response, most of NORAD protection planes sent far away in another ‘exercise’ to prevent response, prevention of examination of wreckage by those assigned to investigate, seismic evidence of a mini yield nuclear explosion, Cheney takes over NORAD response command, Cheney prevents NORAD response, WTC towers designed for 757 collision and fire, 911 used falsely for previously planned war, government fabrication of ‘evidence’ correlation for starting war, hundreds of people found themselves trapped by locked doors and missing escape routes above and below the impact zone, and not all inclusively, but finally, Bush brands anyone noting any of these facts a terrorist.

The spectrum and percentages of cancer are massive. There are at least 4 classifications of blood-cell cancers: leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s and myeloma. There are many more classifications of soft tissue cancers. There is brain cancer. There is breast cancer. For most of these there are subclassifications of many different types of specific cancer in each, so far not publicly disclosed. There are huge percentages of respiratory distress and loss of function. Multiple reports of ‘irregular cycles’ (miscarriages?). Most likely there will be several more types of cancer to follow. In particular, responders should be checked for thyroid cancer and function. There has been no noting of birth defects which also needs to be done. There is one thing and only one thing that can cause all these cancers and problems – RADIATION.
In response to this myriad of disease, a statement of environmental mercury has been claimed. That claim is not verified in testing of air and particle debris samples by private citizens and organizations. It is possible the mercury quotes are from the federal source of science, the United States Geological Survey’s analysis of the WTC dust debris. The USGS’s leached analysis did show mercury at the 3rd lowest concentration of metals at the mean value (mv) of 0.011 parts per Billion (ppB). The most abundant element concentration in the leaching tests was Strontium at 1,000 ppB (1 ppM) – 100,000 times more than the mercury value. It appears that the leaching of the sample was only partial and inadequate as the reader will see from the spectrometry values.

Why would only mercury be quoted when there were so many other more dangerous elements at higher concentrations than mercury? While the regular elements like Copper – mv 136 ppM, Silver – mv 1.66 ppM, and Vanadium – mv 31 ppM, some of the other significant elements were: Barium – mv 533 ppM, Strontium – mv 727 ppM, Cerium – mv 91 ppM, Yttrium – mv 57 ppM, Lanthanum – mv 46 ppM, Molybdenum – mv 11 ppM, Thorium – mv 9 ppM, Uranium – mv 3 ppM, Beryllium – mv 3 ppM, and Cesium – mv 0.6 ppM – partial listing. For readers that are not familiar with most of these elements, here is a link to their relevance.
There is also a claim of environmental benzene that ‘permeated’ the area in jet fuel as the cause of all of these problems. Once again, we have the quoting of the miraculous jet fuel that burns up in a massive fireball in the first few minutes, then like Christ’s feeding the multitudes, still causes a massive fire inside that reaches the temperatures of a Hades that weakens massive fire proofed steel beams and trusses, then resurrects itself on the permeated ground to cause cancer in one hour of limited exposure.

In less than 1 hour, the first WTC building had collapsed and covered Manhattan, in at least 1/3 of a Million Tons of particulate debris. Unless the jet fuel makes a final appearance and is again resurrected by NIST in it’s 3rd miracle, benzene is buried under 1/3 of a million tons of particulate debris after 56 minutes of exposure. Benzene is also a component of gasoline. The assertion that cancer was the result of 56 minutes of exposure to minimal amounts of benzene is ludicrous. If that was true, everyone in the US would be suffering from cancers. As the 3rd WTC building falls, Manhattan is covered in two Billion pounds of pulverized and aerosolized building.
Two billion pounds seemed like an extremely large amount of particulate matter from buildings whose total weight has been quoted at around 3 billion pounds. Debris removal has been quoted at 1.2 billion pounds. Based on these rough numbers 2/3rds of the building was indeed turned to dust or vaporized.

http://www.thepriceofliberty.org/06/09/25/ward.htm

Age
Sex
Symptoms
Diagnosed Illness
Time Spent at Ground Zero
46
M
– Burning of esophagus – Acid reflux
– Hiatel hernia (life long)
Lab (10 yrs.)
Morgue (2 weeks)
WTC (1 week)
Drove CO back and forth with evidence
35
M
– Persistent cough
– Chest pain
– Decreased immune system
– Sarcoidosis
– Asthma
– Rheumatoid arthritis
WTC (120 hours) started working on the 3rd day
52
M
– Throat cancer
49
M
– No symptoms – Aorta aneurysm Ground Zero (1 Month)
37
F
– Shortness of breath – Sarcoidosis – Clean-up (bucket brigade)
– Security at WTC ( 4 months)
42
M
– Shortness of breath – Reactive AOA disfunction syndrome (occupational asthma) WTC (between 400 and 500 hours)
33
M
– Chronic cough – Post-traumatic stress – WTC (1 day)
– Fresh Kills (1 day)
40
F
– No symptoms – Rectal cancer Sep. 2002 Security at ground zero (1 month)
48
M
– No symptoms
– Blood in urine
– Renal cell cancer (kidney cancer) WTC – security ( 2 weeks)
37
M
– Extended cough – Sarcoidosis WTC (2 weeks) – security and traffic control
43
M
– Bile-duct cancer
Deceased
First Responder – WTC (6 months)
48
M
– Tightness in chest
– High blood pressure
Security in hot zone (30 days)
33
M
– Headaches – Brain cancer WTC (2 weeks)
Bucket brigade, security
35
M
– Lump on neck – Thyroid cancer
– Stage 2 multiple myeloma
WTC (12 days)
S.I. landfill (61 days)
34
M
– Difficulty breathing – Pulmonary disease
– Respiratory failure
Deceased
WTC (3 months)
47
M
– Shortness of breath
– Joint stiffness
– Heart attack
– Sarcoidosis
Deceased
WTC (3 months)
39
F
– No symptoms – Sarcoidosis WTC (1 month)
42
M
– Bronchitis (3 times )
– Pneumonia
– Shortness of breath
– Loss of intake
– Chronic lung disease Morgue (9 months)
38
F
– Joint pain
– Shortness of breath
– Chest pain
– Sarcoidosis WTC (5 days)
48
M
– Swelling of hands
– Shortness of breath
– High hemoglobin level
– Scarred lung tissue WTC (2 days)
S.I. landfill (1 day)
41
M
– Irregular heartbeat
– Shortness of breath
– Eyes were burned
– Tumor in left lung
– Debris, scarring, loss of function in right lung
– Cataracts
South tower on 9-11 WTC (1 year—periodically)
34
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Tightness in chest.
– Blocked airway WTC (5 days at 12 hours)
41
M
– Mass in abdomen
– Trouble breathing
– Skin rashes
– Lymphoma WTC ( 3 months)
32
M
– Shortness of breath
– chest pains
– Asthma S.I. Landfill (1 week)
WTC ( 1 week)
44
M
– Weight loss
– shortness of breath
– loss of appetite
– dry mouth
– Pulmonary sarcoidosis WTC (30 days)
44
M
– Coughing blood and
– shortness of breath
– BOOP
– Bronchitis
WTC (Start to finish)
First responder
36
M
– Coughing
– shortness of breath
– wheezing
– extreme heartburn
– Asthma
– RADS
– Sleep apnea
WTC (4 months)
39
M
– Difficulty breathing
– F atigue
– Increased sensibility to heat
– Pulmonary restricted lung disease WTC (1 week)
S.I. Landfill (1 week)
First Responder
45
M
– Anxiety – Hypertension WTC (15 days)
42
M
– Difficulty breathing
– F atigue
– Prostate cancer
– Sleep apnea
– Restrictive lung disease
WTC (4 months)
First Responder
42
M
– Shortness of breath
– Coughing
– Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
– Asthma
WTC (6 months)
34
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Fatigue
– Anxiety
– Decreased airway
– High blood pressure
WTC (3 months)
40
M
– Coughing up blood
– Persistent cough and wheezing
– Gasping
– Cardiomyopathy
– Chronic heart failure
WTC (3 months)
First Responder
45
F
– Swelling of the joints
– Pain in the bones, hips
– Tumors
– Sarcoidosis WTC (6 weeks)
34
M
– Vomiting
– Difficulty breathing
– Chest pains
– Diarrhea
– Dizzy spells
– Asthma
– GERD
– Post-traumatic stress
– Chemical induced bronchitis
– Acid reflux
WTC (3 weeks )
First Responder
37
M
– Colds
– Difficulty breathing
– Winded
– Fatigue
– Chronic sinusitis WTC
S.I. Landfill (1 month and half)
30
F
– Swelling of the joints
– Swelling of the lymphoid
– Numbness of arms and legs
– Sarcoidosis WTC
– S.I. Landfill and Morgue (5 weeks)
40
M
– Difficulty breathing – Chronic sinusitis WTC (6 months)
42
M
– Difficulty breathing – Chronic sinusitis
– Diminished lung capacity
– Reflux
WTC (9 Months)
47
M
– Relatively no symptoms
– Coughing
– Heart attack
– Triple bypass
– Advanced throat cancer
– Acid reflux
WTC (3 months)
First Responder
46
M
– Upper respiratory infection
– Shortness of breath
– Acid reflux
– GERD
– Esphogitis
– Reactive airways disease
– Dispenia
– Extra thoracic airways disease
– Sleep apnea
– Seizures
WTC (4 months)
40
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Fatigue
– Wheezing
– Bronchitis WTC (4 months)
38
F
– Abdominal pain
– Heavy bleeding
– Ffatigue
– Adenoid carcinoma
– Carcinoid (stomach, gall bladder, uterus, fallopian tube, ovaries, appendix and colon)
WTC (2 months)
First Responder
39
M
– Shortness of breath – Decreased lung capacity WTC (3 months)
First Responder
44
M
– Jaundice
– Fatigue
– Body is destroying red blood cells. Dr. wants to remove his spleen. ( No diagnosis.) WTC
Morgue (6 months)
First Responder
48
M
– Anxiety
– H eadache
– Difficulty breathing
– Dizziness
– Poly POD sinus disease
– Asthma
– Lung disease
– Acid reflux
WTC (6 months)
1 year sifting through remains
First Responder
36
F
– Chronic fatigue
– Trouble breathing
– Swollen neck
– Thyroid cancer WTC (5 months)
First Responder
48
M
– Severe cough – Nasal polyps
– Asthma
WTC (3 months)
46
M
– Cough
– Shortness of breath
– Phlegm
– Wheezing and
– Difficulty sleeping
– No diagnosis Morgue (3 months)
First responder
55
M
– Trouble sleeping
– Runny nose
– Post-traumatic stress syndrome
– Sinusitis
WTC (1 year)
First Responder
45
M
– Shortness of breath
– Chest pain
– Excessive protein in urine
– Sarcoidosis
– Nephritic syndrome (affects the kidney)
WTC (3 months)
First Responder
40
M
– Jaundice
– Fatigue
– Shortness of breath
– Throwing up blood
– Joint pains
– Swelling of limbs
– sBlurred vision
– Numbness in finger tips and toes
– Failed liver non-alcoholic steto-hepatitis (liver transplant)
– GERD
WTC (1 month and a half)
First Responder
49
M
– Headaches
– Coughing
– Fatigue
– Sinusitis WTC (1 month)
69
M
– Runny nose
– Lung congestion
– Sinusitis
– Pre-cancerous kidney (removed)
WTC ( 3weeks)
43
M
– Shortness of breath
– Chronic rashes
– Jjoint pain
– Numbing of limbs
– Tumors
– Sarcoidosis WTC (2 months)
S.I. Landfill (2 months)
Morgue (15 days)
45
M
– Pain in left side
– High calcium level
– Fatigue
– Dizziness
– Kidney stones WTC (1 month)
First Responder
29
M
– Coughing up blood and mucus – Chronic upper respiratory infection WTC (2 weeks)
42
F
– Coughing
– Eye irritation
– Headaches
– Sinusitis WTC (1 month and a half)
First Responder
43
M
– Loss of hearing
– Runny nose
– Difficulty breathing
– Heartburn
– Loss of hearing WTC (9 months)
First Responder
36
M
– Nose bleed
– Sinus infection
– Difficulty sleeping
– WTC cough
– Post traumatic stress disorder
– Hypertension
– Kidney stones
– Sinusitis
WTC ( 2 weeks)
First Responder
47
M
– Shortness of breath
– Irregular heartbeat
– Wheezing
– Fatigue
– Numbness
– Sleep apnea WTC (3 days)
First Responder
Volunteer
47
M
– Difficulty sleeping
– Tightness in chest
– Neckaches
– Bad cough
– Headache
– Acid Reflux
– Reactive airways
WTC (2 months)
First Responder
38
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Constant infections
– Fatigue
– Thyroid cancer
– Chronic sinusitis
WTC (3 month)
First Responder
32
M
– Fatigue
– Shortness of breath
– Migraine headaches
– Coughing
– RAD WTC (3 months)
First Responder
36
M
– Chronic cough
– Ffatigue
– Acid reflux WTC (1 week)
First Responder
44
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Short- tempered
– Runny nose
– Sinusitis
– Acid reflux
WTC (18 months all together )
Morgue
S.I. landfill
First Responder
44
M
– Heartburn
– Loss of appetite
– Acid reflux
– Hiatal hernia
– Irritation to stomach lining
WTC (6 months)
First Responder
35
M
– Shortness of breath WTC (2 months)
35
M
– Protein in urine
– H igh cholesterol
– Dizziness
– Ffatigue
– Swelling
– Focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (kidneys) WTC (6 months)
First Responder
37
M
– Headaches
– Fatigue
– Runny nose
– Occupational asthma
– High liver count
– Acid reflux
– Sinusitis
WTC (3 months)
40
M
– Shortness of breath
– Fatigue
– Difficulty sleeping
– RADS WTC (6 months)
First Responder
58
M
– Mass on right side of neck
– Unusual snoring
– Blood in the mucus
– Tonsil cancer WTC (1 week)
First Responder
35
F
– Allergies
– Eexcessive bowl movement
– Abdominal pain
– Dry cough
– Crohn’s disease
– Fistula
46
M
– Upper respiratory infection – Crohn’s disease
– Allergies
WTC
48
M
– Diabetes
– Hip replacement
– High blood pressure
– Diabetes
– Hip replacement
– High blood pressure
WTC (1 ½ months)
First Responder
38
M
– Severe headache – Brain tumor
– Liver tumor
WTC (4 months)
First Responder
34
M
– Low lung volume WTC (2 week)
First Responder
49
M
– Cough
– Difficulty sleeping
– Congestion
WTC (2 weeks)
42
M
– Shortness of breath – Asthma
– Acid reflux
– Bronchitis
WTC (3months)
First Responder
43
M
– Shortness of breath
– Fatigue
– Moodiness
– Nosebleeds
– Nodules on lungs
– Acid reflux
WTC (6 months)
First Responder
35
M
– Diarrhea
– Blood in urine
– Colitis WTC (5 months)
First Responder
43
M
– Blood in urine
– Acid reflux
– Bladder cancer WTC (1 week)
46
M
– Anxiety
– Difficulty sleeping
– Runny nose
– Tightness in the chest
– Sinusitis
– Sleep apnea
– Post traumatic stress
WTC (4 months)
First Responder
43
M
– Wheezing
– Shortness of breath
– Joint pain
WTC (3 weeks)
First Responder
27
M
– Chronic cough
– Difficulty breathing
– Upper respiratory infection
– RADS
– Sinusitis
WTC (3 weeks)
First Responder
38
M
– Shortness of breath
– Coughing
– Fatigue
– Aches
– Headaches
– Loss of appetite
– Sarcoidosis WTC (3 months)
First Responder
36
M
– Shortness of breath
– Dizziness
– Headache
– Vertigo
– Joint pain
– Sarcoidosis WTC ( approx. 4 months)
First Responder
49
F
– Scar tissue on the lungs
– Shortness of breath
– Fatigue
– Joint pain
– Obstructive pulmonary disease WTC (2 month)
First Responder
46
M
– Rash
– Headaches
– Shortness of breath
– Joint pain
– Short temper
– Anxiety
– Difficulty sleeping
– Acid reflux
– High mercury account
WTC (1 month)
First Responder
45
M
– Stomach aches
– Low red blood cell count
– Low white blood cell count
– Spleen removed WTC ( 1 week)
First Responder
42
F
– Recurring cyst WTC (3 months)
First Responder
39
M
– Difficulty sleeping
– Anxiety
– Post traumatic stress disorder WTC (7 months)
First Responder
45
M
– Fatigue
– Difficulty breathing
– Joint pains vertigo
– Headaches
– Anxiety
– Sinusitis
– Acid reflux
– Ulcer
WTC (6 months)
First Responder
44
F
– Difficulty breathing
– Difficulty sleeping
– RADS
– Vocal chord damage
WTC (3 months)
First Responder
43
F
– Bronchitis
– Acid reflux
– Sinusitis
– Cough
– Sarcoidosis WTC (3 months)
First Responder
44
M
– Cough
– Difficulty breathing
– RADS
– Sinusitis
– rhinitis
– Esophogitis
– GERD
– Sleep apnea
– Lung scarring
WTC (2 months)
S.I. Landfill (1 month
37
M
– Anxiety
– Depression
– Post traumatic stress disorder WTC
First Responder
31
M
– Diarrhea
– Blood in stool
– Colitis WTC (2 weeks)
First Responder
49
M
– Blood in urine
– Difficulty breathing
– Tumor in the bladder WTC (4 months)
First Responder
44
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Joint pain
– Recurring bronchitis
– Sarcoidosis
– Asthma
WTC (1month)
First Responder
38
M
– Fatigue
– Headaches
– High blood pressure
– Difficulty breathing
– Glomerolul nephritis (kidney disease) WTC (2 weeks)
First Responder
35
M
– Bloating
– Heartburn
– Loss of appetite
– Acid reflux WTC (6 months)
Morgue (2 months)
41
M
– Bone pain
– Back pain
– Multiple myeloma (cancer of the plasma cell) WTC (2 days)
Morgue & S. I. Landfill (3 weeks)
44
M
– Lump in the leg – Soft tissue cancer WTC (1 week)
45
F
– Joint pain
– Trouble sleeping
– Leukemia WTC (2 years)
47
M
– Lump in throat – Throat cancer WTC ( 2 ½ months)
47
M
– Muscle pain – Herniated disk
– Partial tears in muscle tissue
WTC (2 weeks)
S.I. Landfill (1 week)
37
F
– Shortness of breath
– Tightness of the chest
– Asthma
– Sleep apnea
WTC (2 months)
44
M
– Difficulty breathing – Heart attack WTC (2 months)
First Responder
46
M
– Shortness of breath – Lung cancer WTC & Morgue (8 months)
49
M
– Shortness of breath
– Difficulty sleeping
– Coughing
– PTSD
– Restricted lung disease
WTC (8 months)
43
M
– Severe cough – Asthma WTC (1 ½ months)
46
M
– Stomach pain
– Difficulty breathing
– Acid reflux
– High mercury count
WTC ( 1 month)
First Responder
46
M
– Headaches
– Severe cough
– Difficulty sleeping
– Short tempered
– Fatigue
– Joint pain
– High blood pressure
– Diabetes
– Spots on the lungs
– PTSD
– Removal of gall bladder (impacted due to stones)
WTC (9 months)
First Responde
38
M
– Swollen ankles
– Chronic cough
– Night sweats
– Sarcoidosis WTC (2 weeks)
First Responder
32
M
– Lumps
– Anal fistulas
– Hernia
– Acid reflux
– Shortness of breath
– Skin rashes
– Crohn’s disease WTC (2 1/2 months)
First Responder
39
M
– Difficulty breathing and sleeping – Asthma
– PTSD
WTC (3 months)
40
M
– Shakes
– Difficulty sleeping
– Severe cough
– High blood pressure (still in testing phase) WTC (2 1/2 months)
First Responder
37
M
– Rash – Melanoma WTC (3 months)
First Responder
47
M
– Frequent migraines
– Difficulty sleeping
– Glaucoma WTC (2 months)
First Responder
40
M
– Shortness of breath – Asthma WTC (2 months)
First Responder
44
M
– Bloating
– Weakness
– difficulty eating and drinking
– Dehydration
– Short bowel syndrome (large part of small intestine removed) WTC (2 months)
First Responder
46
M
– Headaches
– Backaches
– Polycythemia vera (clonal stem cell disorder) WTC (3 months)
First Responder
52
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Wheezing
– Asthma WTC
First Responder
48
M
– Difficulty breathing – Asthma WTC (1 1/2 months)
First Responder
30
M
– High liver enzymes
– Gastritis
– Heartburn
– Nausea
– Stomach pain
– Liver biopsy/colonoscopy
– Gall bladder removed
WTC (4 months)
First Responder
40
M
– Back pain
– Night sweats
– Difficulty sleeping
– Cancer of the kidneys and liver WTC
First Responder
33
M
– Bronchitis
– Chest pain
– Migraines
– Cough
– Difficulty breathing
– Duodenal polyps
– GERD
– Reflux
– Two nodules in the lungs
– Sleep apnea
– Sinusitis
WTC (9 months)
First Responder
38
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Fatigue
– Rotting trachea
– Decreased lung capacity
WTC (9 months)
First Responder
49
M
– Congestion
– Headaches
– Shortness of breath
– Loss of sight
– Adeno carcinoma (cancer in the left sinus)
Deceased (2004)
WTC
36
M
– Cough
– Fatigue
– Weight loss
– Reduced lung capacity
– Irregular heart beat
– Sarcoidosis WTC (2 months)
48
M
– Shortness of breath
– Chronic bronchitis
– Stiffness in the chest
– Difficulty sleeping
– Asthma
– RADS
– Sleep apnea
WTC
First Responder
52
M
– Shortness of breath
– Difficulty breathing
– Pulmonary fibrosis WTC (4 months)
52
M
– Lump in the throat
– Difficulty sleeping
– Difficulty breathing
– Vomiting
– pre-cancer of the esophagus
– gastroperisis (hardening of stomach muscle)
– GERD
WTC
First Responder
43
M
– Shortness of breath
– Wheezing
– Cough
– Asthma
– GERD
WTC (6 months)
38
F
– Shortness of breath
– High blood pressure
– Chest pain
– Difficulty sleeping
–Joint pain
– RADS
– Sleep Apnea
– GERD
– Vocal chord dysfunction
– Sinusitis
– Enlarged heart
– Decreased lung capacity
– nodules in the lung
WTC
43
M
– Wheezing
– Tightness in the chest
– Asthma WTC (6 months)
52
M
– Shortness of breath
– Bronchitis
– Muscle pain
– Acid reflux
– Heart Attack (2002)
WTC
First Responder
36
F
– Difficulty breathing
– Fatigue
– Headaches
– Asthma
– Thyroid issues (not yet diagnosed)
WTC
First Responder
43
M
– Constant headache
– Dizziness
– Earaches
– Difficulty breathing
– Joint pains
– Difficulty sleeping
– Sinusitis
– Chronic bronchitis
WTC
First Responder
49
M
– Earaches
– Nodules on the lung
– Difficulty sleeping
– Muscle aches
– Inflamed lymph nodes
– Chronic conjunctivitis
– Calcified heart
– Calcified aortic valve
WTC
First Responder (1½ months)
48
M
– Throat burning
– Chronic cough
– Chest pain
– Difficulty sleeping
– Headaches
– Dizziness
– memory loss
– PTSD
– Asthma
– Acid Reflux
WTC
First Responder
45
F
– Difficulty swallowing – Neck tumor WTC
First Responder (7 months)
36
M
– Vertigo
– Inability to maintain balance
– Tumor in pituitary gland WTC (2 weeks)
M
– Post nasal drip
– Difficulty breathing
– Sarcoidosis WTC (3 months)
37
M
– Stuffy nose
– Headaches
– Sore throats
– Wheezing
– Acid reflux
– Sinusitis
WTC (6 months)
44
M
– Chronic cough
– Difficulty breathing
– RADS WTC
First Responder
42
M
– Night sweats
– Difficulty breathing
– RADS
– Lymphatic tumors in the chest
– Asbestos exposure in the lung (precursor to cancer of the lung)– GERD
WTC
First Responder
33
M
– Acid reflux
– Lung infection
– Swelling in the throat
– Nasal and sinus problem
– sSleep apnea
– Tonsil, uvula, soft palette, septum removed (geoglassol advancement)
– Pneumonia
– Chronic sinusitis
– Asthma
– Sinusitis
WTC (4 months)
First Responder
46
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Headaches
– Passing out
– Imbalance
– Memory loss
– Vertigo
– Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes) WTC
First Responder
48
M
– Difficulty breathing
– Headaches
– Passing out
– Imbalance
– Memory loss
– Vertigo
– RADS
– Acid Reflux
– Vestibular dysfunction (brain damage)
– Gata taxia ( tumor) below ribs
WTC & S.I. (8 months)
First Responder
35
M
– Shortness of breath
– Dizziness spell
– Swelling of the lungs
– Joint pains
– Headaches
– Constant lung infections
– Asthma WTC & S.I. (1 year)
First Responder
38
M
– Persistent cough
– Difficulty breathing
– Headaches
– Lung infection
– Scarring on the lungs
– Asthma
– Sinusitis
– RADS
WTC & S.I. (1 year)
First Responder
31
M
– Persistent stuffy nose
– Chest pains
– RADS WTC (2 years)
First Responder
45
M
– Dizziness
– Vertigo
– Blurry vision
– Imbalance
– Headaches
– Benign positional vertigo WTC & S.I.
First Responder
36
F
– Wheezing
– Aching bones
– Repeated bronchitis
– Headache
– Asthma WTC
(2 months)
35
M
– Pains in the chest – Esophagitis WTC
(1 week)
41
M
– Headaches
– Sinus infections
– Stomach pains
– Wheezing
– Difficulty sleeping
– Sinusitis
– Erosion of the esophagus
– Acid Reflux
– Reoccurring stye in the eye
WTC
First Responder
54
M
– Bleeding polyps
– Heartburn
– Stomach pains
– Colon cancer WTC
(1 month)
35
M
– Numbness in hands and feet
– Peeling hands
– Sore throat
– Tonsilitis
– Deviated septum
– Allergic rhinitis WTC
First Responder
48
F
– Stomach pains – Colon rectal cancer WTC
(2 weeks)
38
M
– Difficulty breathing
– B lurred vision
– Sinusitis
– Scarring of the retina
WTC
First Responder
45
F
– Lump in left breast – Breast cancer WTC
First Responder
43
F
– Headaches
– Joint pains
– Difficulty sleeping
– No diagnosis WTC
First Responder
48
M
– No symptoms – Renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer) WTC
47
M
– Cough – Heart attack (deceased) WTC
First Responder
50
M
– Fatigue
– Runny nose
– Barrett’s esophagus (pre-cancer of the esophagus) WTC
First Responder
35
M
– Fatigue
– Shortness of breath
– Nose bleeds
– Joint pains
– Chronic sinusitis
– Ground glass in the lungs
– Pulmonary hypertension
WTC
First Responder
28
M
– Cough – Lymphoma WTC
First Responder
38 F – Difficulty breathing
– Blurry vision
– Joint pain
– Memory loss
– Difficulty sleeping
– Sarcoidosis WTC
First Responder
43 M – Chest pain
– Hair loss
– Difficulty sleeping
– GERD
– Cough
– H. pylori (bacteria affecting gastrointestinal system)
– IBS
WTC
First Responder
47 M – Lump – Cancer in the neck
– GERD
– Decrease in lung capacity
WTC
First Responder
44 M – Bleeding
– Pimple on nose
– Difficulty moving arms
– Miscarriage
– Fibromyalgia
– Carcinoma (nose cancer)
Morgue/WTC
6 months
45 M – Shortness of breath
– Chest pain
– Congestion
– Asthma WTC
First Responder
44 M – Difficulty breathing
– Chest pains
– Acid reflux
– RADS
– Sleep apnea
WTC
2 months
44 M Chest pain – Burnt esophagus
– Coronary spasm
WTC
First Responder
36 M – Difficulty breathing
– Recurring sinus infections
– Severe headaches
– Polyps
– Deviated septum
45 M – Headaches
– Ringing in the ear
– Difficulty breathing
– Difficulty sleeping
– Arm and hip pains
– Vertigo
– Meneire’s Disease
WTC
First Responder
45 F – Difficulty sleeping
– Joint pains
– Headaches
– Difficulty breathing
– Sleep apnea
– Acid reflux
– Severe sinusitis
– Asthma
– Bronchitis
– Nasal polyps
WTC
First Responder
37 M – Dizziness
– Blurry vision
– Headaches
– Chronic cough
– Shortness of breath
– Joint pains
– Chronic vomiting
– Sarcoidosis
– GERD
– Vertigo
– Asthma
– Esophagitis
WTC
First Responder
37 M – Shortness of breath
– Tightness in chest
– Difficulty sleeping
– Headaches
– Chronic bronchitis
– High blood pressure
– Asthma
– Acid reflux
WTC
First Responder
46 F – Difficulty breathing
– Shortness of breath
– Asthma
– Hypertension
WTC
First Responder
32 M – Swollen glands – Follicular non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma WTC
First Responder
38 M – Cough
– Chronic bronchitis
– Shortness of breath
– Chest pains
– Headaches
– Difficulty sleeping
– Nodules on lungs WTC
First Responder
M – Difficulty breathing – Asthma
– Sinusitis
WTC
First Responder
53 M – Pneumonia
– Asthma
– Shortness of breath
– Sarcoidosis WTC
First Responder
55 F – Difficulty breathing
– Depression
– Coughing
– PTSD
– COPD
WTC
2 years
37 M – Vomiting
– Dizziness
– Constant ringing in the ear
– Sharp headaches
– Meniere’s syndrome WTC
First Responder
32 M – Swollen lymph nodes – Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma WTC
9 months
33 M – Chest pains
– Difficulty breathing
– Esophagitis WTC
40 M – Acid reflux
– Bloating
– Constipation
– Crohn’s disease
47 F – Hoarseness in throat – Thyroid cancer S.I. Landfill
38 M – No symptoms – Nodules in left lung WTC – 1 month
S.I. Landfill – 1 year
42 M – sinus infection
– ear infections
– mono
– Myalgic enciephalomyelitis
– (post viral fatigue)
WTC
First Responder
48 M – elevated PSA
– difficulty keeping food down
– Prostate cancer
– Acid reflux
WTC
First Responder
46 M – Abdominal pain
– Cramping
– Acid reflux
– GERD
– Difficulty breathing
– Bronchitis
– Diverticulitis (Inflammation of the intestine; removed 12 inches of colon)
– Hiatal hernia
WTC
First Responder
37 M – Pain and swelling inthe right testicle
– Difficulty breathing
– Headache
– Testicular cancer
Asthma
– Acid reflux
– Recurring bronchitis and pneumonia
WTC
First Responder
39 M – Coughing
– Rapid heart beat
– Joint pain
– Dizziness
– Syncope
– Sarcoidosis WTC
First Responder
47 M – Weight loss
– Jaundice
– Pancreatic cancer
– Endocarcinoma
– Ampullary tumor
** Very rare form
WTC
First Responder
38 M – Discoloration in urine – Recurring bladder cancer
– GERD
– High-grade bladder cancer
WTC
First Responder
45 M – Difficulty breathing
– Pneumonia
(every six weeks)
– Sarcoidosis WTC
First Responder
47 M No symptoms – Prostate cancer WTC
First Responder
40 M – Seizure – Brain tumor WTC
First Responder

Medical effects of nuclear bombing in Afghanistan

According to Hank, under the cover of massive DU-tipped bombs that raised dirty mushroom clouds in thunderous explosions that rained radioactive dust over Jalalabad and nearby villages, the first nuclear bombs dropped since Basra in 1991 were detonated by American forces in Afghanistan beginning in March 2002. Before their field tests were concluded, United States forces would explode four 5-kiloton GBU-400 nuclear bombs in Tora Bora and other mountainous regions of Afghanistan.[….]

WATCH THE BIRDIES

Meanwhile, Taliban fighters pounded night and day north of Kabul were dying from no visible injuries – except the blood flowing out of their mouths from internal bleeding. Near the Rish-Khor military base in the Afghan northern capitol, birds sat on tree branches with blood running from their beaks. As one eyewitness later recounted, “‘We were amazed to see all these birds sitting quietly on branches. But when we shook the tree the birds fell down and we saw blood coming out of their mouths. Then we climbed the trees to see those that were still stuck on tree branches, all of them had bled from their mouths. Two of the birds appeared to be partly melted into the trees branches’.”

According to PhD Mohammed Daud Miraki, who collected many first-hand accounts on the after-effects of heavy U.S. bombing, “many dead Taliban soldiers had severe discoloration of the skin, orange, without being burned, while others had their rifles melted in their hands.”

A medical doctor named Wazir reported, “Most of the victims have had respiratory problems and internal bleeding for which there is no apparent cause.” [khalifa.com Oct 30/01]

Were these symptoms caused by the massive concussive blasts of fuel-air bombs?

Very likely. When American jets dropped bunker busters at daybreak on the mud homes of Karam, the village was completely destroyed in massive craters. Many residents were killed from what appeared to be internal concussive injuries.

But other victims of American bombing exhibited symptoms of radiation sickness. In describing “another bizarre, yet tragic scene,” Dr, Mohammed continued, “Many Taliban soldiers that survived the bombing in the north have died after returning to their native villages in the south and southeast of the country. They had no physical injury upon their death, however, died from internal bleeding and other bizarre symptoms including uncontrolled vomiting, diarrhea, and blood loss in urine and stool. Their families were shocked with disbelieves.” [Afghan DU & Recovery Fund]

Perplexed by such symptoms, and uniquely “hot” munitions debris, medical teams and technical experts thought they were looking at “enhanced” Non-Depleted Uranium from a new generation of radioactive cannon shells, bomb and missile casings.

In fact, they were very likely looking at severe contamination from actual nuclear weapons.[….]

Alerted to the “radioactive, toxic uranium alloys and hard-target uranium warheads used by the coalition forces,” the UMRC team started looking for radiation poisoning. What they found was, in their words, “astonishing” and “astounding”.

Identifying “several hundred people suffering from illnesses and conditions similar to those of Gulf veterans,” the team began administering tests. “Without exception, every person donating urine specimens tested positive for uranium internal contamination,” UMRC reported. But the readings were off the scale of previous known DU exposures: “The results were astounding: the donors presented concentrations of toxic and radioactive uranium isotopes between 100 and 400 times greater than in the Gulf veterans tested in 1999.”

A control group three uncontaminated Afghans averaged 9.4 nanograms of uranium per litre of urine. The average for 17 randomly selected patients Jalalabad, Kabul, Tora Bora and Mazar-i-Sharif was 315.5 nanograms. A 12-year-old boy living near Kabul displayed 2,031 nanograms.

The maximum permissible level for members of the American public is 12 nanograms per litre. [….]

Other medical survey teams also reported that in bombardments of the Tora Bora, Shaikoot and Bagram frontline, “large number of antiaircraft weapons and rifles had melted… Many Taliban soldiers were seen with blood coming out from their mouths, noses and ears.” Those who returned to their villages “started to vomit blood and had bloody stools. Subsequently, many have died from their conditions.”

After the bombardment in Khost, public health workers reported seeing skin lesions. In a manner resembling the victims of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Afghan people who developed skin lesions died after their conditions deteriorated.

In Pachir Wa Agam district near Tora Bora, “women started to suffer from a deadly condition. Several months after the bombing, women of the area would become angry by petty things and that anger turns into rage, which subsequently causes the women to collapse and die. My team also reported that many children are born with no limbs, no eyes, or tumors protruding out from their mouths and their eyes,” its leader related.

“Subsequent to the contamination, newborn children have physical deformities, and those that do not have physical deformity are suffering from Mental Retardation. These cases are reported from Paktia, Nangarhar, Bagram, Mazar-i-Sharif and Kunduz,” the UMRC stated.[..]

According to Mohammed Daud Miraki’s extensive public health survey, “Most of the people that developed various health problems have died; others suffer from conditions such as kidney disease/failure, confusion, and loss of immunity and painful joints.”

Dr. Durakovic told reporters, “If UMRC’s Nangarhar findings are corroborated in other communities across Afghanistan, the country faces a severe public health disaster… every subsequent generation is at risk.” [BBC May3/03]

By October 2002, Afghan doctors citing rapid deaths from internal ailments were accusing the coalition of using chemical and radioactive weapons. The symptoms they reported (hemorrhaging, pulmonary constriction and vomiting) could have resulted from radiation contamination. [LeMonde Diplomatique Mar/02]

But inhalation, ingestion or wound-contamination by Depleted Uranium particles does not lead to such acute radiation poisoning symptoms immediately after exposure.

http://www.willthomasonline.net/willthomasonline/Tora_Bora.html